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    Why Do I Need to Eat Vegetables?

     

     

  • Whether they're fresh, frozen or canned; eating more vegetables is one of the easiest things we can all do for better health and well-being.

     

    All vegetables can be considered superfoods as they are naturally packed full of important vitamins and minerals, disease-fighting antioxidants and gut-healthy fibre. Plus, they taste really good!

     

    Eating vegetables each day can help you to maintain a healthy weight, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, plus protect you against chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer.

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  • In a Snapshot

    1

    Low Percentages

    Only 4% of us eat the recommended amount of veg each day with the average person eating half as much as they should. Children 2-18 years averaged 1.8 serves per day and less than 1% usually consumed their recommended number of vegetable serves.

    2

    Worldwide Issues

    Health issues connected to unhealthy food are being seen worldwide. Latest research reveals diets and mental health are related.

    3

    Brain Food

    Areas of the brain connecting memory and learning can be affected across all ages with diets lacking in vegetables.

    4

    What We Eat

    Fruits and veg, whole grains, lean meats and fish, beans, legumes, nuts and seeds are frequently replaced with processed foods laden with unhealthy fats, salt and sugars.

  • Did You Know: Fast Facts

    Latest Research Shows Australian’s Need to Eat More

    Research Confirms

    Research confirms fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and fish, beans, legumes, nuts and seeds are frequently replaced with processed foods laden with loads of unhealthy fats, salt and sugars.

    Food Fuel

    Nutritious food fuels our brains and bodies; however, our tendency to reach for convenience foods, as opposed to the balanced diet, is resulting in many of us not meeting basic dietary requirements.

    Extra Benefits

    Recent findings from surveys and intervention trials suggest that consuming a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables also has benefits for mental health such as better mood and reducing the risk of depression across the lifespan.

    Dietary Links

    Current research reveals that diet and mental health are related. Poor diet is now believed to be linked to negative mental health and a greater risk of depression and anxiety, and also impacts memory and learning.